black holes and gray matter. in one thousand tangos.

             
"It’s not really about asking for the raise, but knowing and having faith that the system will actually give you the right raises as you go along…That’s good karma. It will come back. That’s the kind of person that I want to trust, that I want to give more responsibility to.”
Microsoft CEO Satya Nadella, at the Grace Hopper Celebration of Women in Computing 
"Women are paid less than men, and one reason is that women are less likely to negotiate for raises or promotions. They feel more anxiety about negotiating and are less likely to consider job situations to be negotiable, according to Linda Babcock, an economics professor at Carnegie Mellon University and a leading researcher on women and pay negotiations.
In a study of Carnegie Mellon business school graduates, she found that the starting salaries of men were an average of 7.6 percent higher than those of women. And here is one reason, according to Ms. Babcock: Fifty-seven percent of men negotiated their pay, but only 7 percent of women did, despite the fact that they were coached at business school to negotiate compensation. Those who did negotiate increased their starting salaries an average of 7.4 percent. Men had starting offers that were an average of $4,000 higher than for women, and people who negotiated received $4,053 more.
Women’s behavior is just half the equation. The other half is how they are treated when they ask. One of the reasons that Mr. Nadella’s comments provoked such a response at the conference and on social media is that he also seemed to confirm a common fear: that women who negotiate their compensation will pay a price.”
“If women are perceived to be ‘clamoring’ for the same resources as men, they may lose the grace of their idealized feminine niceness and be rejected for demanding what is not due to them.” …
Many people responding to Mr. Nadella’s comments asked whether he got to the chief executive position by asking for it or by quietly waiting to be noticed. Microsoft declined to comment on that question.”
Why Microsoft’s Nadella Is Wrong About Women and Raises

"It’s not really about asking for the raise, but knowing and having faith that the system will actually give you the right raises as you go along…That’s good karma. It will come back. That’s the kind of person that I want to trust, that I want to give more responsibility to.”

Microsoft CEO Satya Nadella, at the Grace Hopper Celebration of Women in Computing 

"Women are paid less than men, and one reason is that women are less likely to negotiate for raises or promotions. They feel more anxiety about negotiating and are less likely to consider job situations to be negotiable, according to Linda Babcock, an economics professor at Carnegie Mellon University and a leading researcher on women and pay negotiations.

In a study of Carnegie Mellon business school graduates, she found that the starting salaries of men were an average of 7.6 percent higher than those of women. And here is one reason, according to Ms. Babcock: Fifty-seven percent of men negotiated their pay, but only 7 percent of women did, despite the fact that they were coached at business school to negotiate compensation. Those who did negotiate increased their starting salaries an average of 7.4 percent. Men had starting offers that were an average of $4,000 higher than for women, and people who negotiated received $4,053 more.

Women’s behavior is just half the equation. The other half is how they are treated when they ask. One of the reasons that Mr. Nadella’s comments provoked such a response at the conference and on social media is that he also seemed to confirm a common fear: that women who negotiate their compensation will pay a price.”

“If women are perceived to be ‘clamoring’ for the same resources as men, they may lose the grace of their idealized feminine niceness and be rejected for demanding what is not due to them.” …

Many people responding to Mr. Nadella’s comments asked whether he got to the chief executive position by asking for it or by quietly waiting to be noticed. Microsoft declined to comment on that question.”

Why Microsoft’s Nadella Is Wrong About Women and Raises

“Gentlemen, take heed. Our children are getting soft. Not just wimpy, or less sharp, but doughy. And pale, too. As the generation that has overseen childhood obesity levels quadruple and the induction of nature deficit disorder, we should be ashamed.
What happened to childhood? It’s turned into on-the-job training for overworked, overachieving, and overstuffed future stroke and heart attack victims, shielded from what should be the best days of their lives by a hyper-competitive culture and paranoia towards unfounded, statistically improbable dangers.”
“Even as we spend our days like perfectionist fairy godmothers floating above our children—trying from birth to sculpt Baby Einsteins, constantly dousing them with sanitizer, sourcing single origin organic whole foods, ensconcing them in bubble wrap and armored accoutrements just to teach them to ride a tricycle—we are still fucking blowing it on a fundamental level. All this overly-compensated smothering is just leading to a population of wimpy, binge-drinking stalkers who can’t cope with day-to-day life, spiraling towards a lifetime of prescription medication Band-Aids.
Our control freak quest to provide the perfect childhood and produce the perfect child is backfiring. Or worse: It is just making our kids hurt themselves.
15% of college students now experience from chronic anxiety, self-mutilation is rampant, affecting 15% of all adolescents, and 40% of women in college will suffer from anorexia or bulimia, all in an attempt at exerting some form of control over their own lives. This same innate need to be their own person is a leading cause of over-drinking, which reduces the above anxiety and also requires little to no social skills; and that same lack of social skills and experience with relationship development leads to stalking and violence. 
What’s that saying about the road to Hell’s pavement again?”
Read on: The Kids Are Not Alright

Gentlemen, take heed. Our children are getting soft. Not just wimpy, or less sharp, but doughy. And pale, too. As the generation that has overseen childhood obesity levels quadruple and the induction of nature deficit disorder, we should be ashamed.

What happened to childhood? It’s turned into on-the-job training for overworked, overachieving, and overstuffed future stroke and heart attack victims, shielded from what should be the best days of their lives by a hyper-competitive culture and paranoia towards unfounded, statistically improbable dangers.”

Even as we spend our days like perfectionist fairy godmothers floating above our children—trying from birth to sculpt Baby Einsteins, constantly dousing them with sanitizer, sourcing single origin organic whole foods, ensconcing them in bubble wrap and armored accoutrements just to teach them to ride a tricycle—we are still fucking blowing it on a fundamental level. All this overly-compensated smothering is just leading to a population of wimpy, binge-drinking stalkers who can’t cope with day-to-day life, spiraling towards a lifetime of prescription medication Band-Aids.

Our control freak quest to provide the perfect childhood and produce the perfect child is backfiring. Or worse: It is just making our kids hurt themselves.

15% of college students now experience from chronic anxiety, self-mutilation is rampant, affecting 15% of all adolescents, and 40% of women in college will suffer from anorexia or bulimia, all in an attempt at exerting some form of control over their own lives. This same innate need to be their own person is a leading cause of over-drinking, which reduces the above anxiety and also requires little to no social skills; and that same lack of social skills and experience with relationship development leads to stalking and violence. 

What’s that saying about the road to Hell’s pavement again?”

Read on: The Kids Are Not Alright

"I’m always sad.""Are there certain thoughts associated with the sadness?""No, the sadness is under the thoughts. It’s like when you’re on a camping trip, and it’s really cold, and you put on extra socks, and an extra sweater, but you still can’t get warm, because the coldness is in your bones.""Do you hope to get away from it?""Not anymore. I just hope to come to peace with it."
humansofnewyork

"I’m always sad."
"Are there certain thoughts associated with the sadness?"
"No, the sadness is under the thoughts. It’s like when you’re on a camping trip, and it’s really cold, and you put on extra socks, and an extra sweater, but you still can’t get warm, because the coldness is in your bones."
"Do you hope to get away from it?"
"Not anymore. I just hope to come to peace with it."

humansofnewyork

(via frangis45)

©2011 Kateoplis