black holes and gray matter. in one thousand tangos.

             
Diamonds Are Bullshit
“American males enter adulthood through a peculiar rite of passage - they spend most of their savings on a shiny piece of rock. They could invest the money in assets that will compound over time and someday provide a nest egg. Instead, they trade that money for a diamond ring, which isn’t much of an asset at all. As soon as you leave the jeweler with a diamond, it loses over 50% of its value. 
Americans exchange diamond rings as part of the engagement process, because in 1938 De Beers decided that they would like us to. Prior to a stunningly successful marketing campaign 1938, Americans occasionally exchanged engagement rings, but wasn’t a pervasive occurrence. Not only is the demand for diamonds a marketing invention, but diamonds aren’t actually that rare. Only by carefully restricting the supply has De Beers kept the price of a diamond high.
Countless American dudes will attest that the societal obligation to furnish a diamond engagement ring is both stressful and expensive. But here’s the thing - this obligation only exists because the company that stands to profit from it willed it into existence.  
So here is a modest proposal: Let’s agree that diamonds are bullshit and reject their role in the marriage process. Let’s admit that as a society we got tricked for about century into coveting sparkling pieces of carbon, but it’s time to end the nonsense.”
Read on.

Diamonds Are Bullshit

American males enter adulthood through a peculiar rite of passage - they spend most of their savings on a shiny piece of rock. They could invest the money in assets that will compound over time and someday provide a nest egg. Instead, they trade that money for a diamond ring, which isn’t much of an asset at all. As soon as you leave the jeweler with a diamond, it loses over 50% of its value. 

Americans exchange diamond rings as part of the engagement process, because in 1938 De Beers decided that they would like us to. Prior to a stunningly successful marketing campaign 1938, Americans occasionally exchanged engagement rings, but wasn’t a pervasive occurrence. Not only is the demand for diamonds a marketing invention, but diamonds aren’t actually that rare. Only by carefully restricting the supply has De Beers kept the price of a diamond high.

Countless American dudes will attest that the societal obligation to furnish a diamond engagement ring is both stressful and expensive. But here’s the thing - this obligation only exists because the company that stands to profit from it willed it into existence.  

So here is a modest proposal: Let’s agree that diamonds are bullshit and reject their role in the marriage process. Let’s admit that as a society we got tricked for about century into coveting sparkling pieces of carbon, but it’s time to end the nonsense.”

Read on.

/ Show
  1. falbet reblogged this from nomu-nomu
  2. lajeunefeministe reblogged this from kateoplis
  3. sideblogforlikes reblogged this from siriuslyme
  4. neonmuziclights reblogged this from liberte-ou-mort
  5. ayjada reblogged this from hannahkc and added:
    Diamonds Are Bullshit “American males enter adulthood through a peculiar rite of passage - they spend most of their...
  6. nicpostman reblogged this from yabamena
  7. durrnit reblogged this from paragative and added:
    A friend said “fuck that” and got a crystal ring instead because why should anyone else judge
  8. paragative reblogged this from zackarooo
  9. adamagedstatueofagoddess reblogged this from sparklebiscuit
  10. zackarooo reblogged this from apoplecticskeptic
  11. sparklebiscuit reblogged this from misanthrobot and added:
    Conflict minerals: no thanks.
  12. misanthrobot reblogged this from creativityprocess
  13. prettysoldiersailorbri reblogged this from bohrscht and added:
    Not only that but in some cases, a diamond’s origins can’t be traced and likely because they’re blood diamonds (or...
  14. bohrscht reblogged this from creativityprocess
  15. creativityprocess reblogged this from lafemmeluna
  16. lafemmeluna reblogged this from yabamena
  17. yabamena reblogged this from bounddreamer and added:
    Always said diamonds were overrated.
  18. bounddreamer reblogged this from eirenical and added:
    The full article is fascinating, and appalling. Also: I don’t have a diamond ring and have no regrets about that.
  19. altarflame reblogged this from papersandstrings
  20. schreberpants reblogged this from eirenical and added:
    THIS! I feel so validated. Both my engagement rings were, at my insistance, Garnets. (also apparently the “traditional”...
  21. dapple-appple reblogged this from scotchtrooper
  22. thefourwindsbar reblogged this from piscine-unrelated and added:
    There is something to be said for them being the hardest natural material, but I’ve always found the obsession a bit...
  23. andreasneale reblogged this from psywing and added:
    I was just telling people the other day how bullshit diamonds were because they are literally the same thing as carbon...
  24. piscine-unrelated reblogged this from scotchtrooper
  25. punkrockpony reblogged this from psywing
  26. psywing reblogged this from ashemountain
  27. elchulo reblogged this from scotchtrooper and added:
    Diamonds Are Bullshit “American males enter adulthood through a peculiar rite of passage - they spend most of their...
  28. ashemountain reblogged this from scotchtrooper and added:
    CZ is actually BETTER than diamonds but because it’s “fake,” we hate it. But yes, diamonds are bullshit. Engagement...
  29. scotchtrooper reblogged this from the-milk-eyed-mender and added:
    I’m not a fan of diamonds, personally. Not for any noble political reason, they’re just so… boring. Ideally, they’re...
  30. daddy-klaine reblogged this from rainwasheseverythingaway and added:
    So, this was fascinating, purely from a “knowledge-I-never-knew-I-wanted-to-know” stand-point, as well as all the...
  31. rainwasheseverythingaway reblogged this from mediumtrip
  32. mediumtrip reblogged this from canuckjacq
blog comments powered by Disqus
©2011 Kateoplis