black holes and gray matter. in one thousand tangos.

             
"We’ve discovered a thousand planets orbiting other stars. We’ve discovered a new branch of the tree of life called, collectively, "extremophiles," that thrive in conditions that can kill other animal and humans — conditions of high pressure, high radiation, high density — or low density, low pressure; anything that we would think of as extreme is just natural for this branch of life. …
The whole field of astrobiology has come of age; we’re searching for the signatures of life in the atmospheres of the exoplanets, for example. We’ve confirmed that the dinosaurs died by asteroid, and that asteroid crater is in the Yucatan Peninsula in what is now Mexico. So the idea that such an event could render 70%of the world’s species extinct is itself an extraordinary result. 
What else has deepened? We know the age of the universe with more precision than ever before; we know a little bit more about the behavior of subatomic particles with the discovery of the Higgs Boson, a field made by a particle that gives mass to other particles; there’s discussion of the multiverse, where we are just one bubble out of an uncountable number of other bubbles of universes coming in and out of existence. So there’s a lot more science, but Cosmos is not about bringing the latest science to the public. There are documentaries that do that, and very good documentaries at that. …
What distinguishes us is the context in which this information is presented, and the context for Cosmos is how and why any of this science matters; what effect does it have on your outlook, your cosmic perspective; and in that way Cosmos can be taken to heart; Cosmos can influence you not only intellectually but emotionally. And with its good doses of awe and wonder, it can even affect you spiritually.”
Read on: Rolling Stone

"We’ve discovered a thousand planets orbiting other stars. We’ve discovered a new branch of the tree of life called, collectively, "extremophiles," that thrive in conditions that can kill other animal and humans — conditions of high pressure, high radiation, high density — or low density, low pressure; anything that we would think of as extreme is just natural for this branch of life. …

The whole field of astrobiology has come of age; we’re searching for the signatures of life in the atmospheres of the exoplanets, for example. We’ve confirmed that the dinosaurs died by asteroid, and that asteroid crater is in the Yucatan Peninsula in what is now Mexico. So the idea that such an event could render 70%of the world’s species extinct is itself an extraordinary result. 

What else has deepened? We know the age of the universe with more precision than ever before; we know a little bit more about the behavior of subatomic particles with the discovery of the Higgs Boson, a field made by a particle that gives mass to other particles; there’s discussion of the multiverse, where we are just one bubble out of an uncountable number of other bubbles of universes coming in and out of existence. So there’s a lot more science, but Cosmos is not about bringing the latest science to the public. There are documentaries that do that, and very good documentaries at that. …

What distinguishes us is the context in which this information is presented, and the context for Cosmos is how and why any of this science matters; what effect does it have on your outlook, your cosmic perspective; and in that way Cosmos can be taken to heart; Cosmos can influence you not only intellectually but emotionally. And with its good doses of awe and wonder, it can even affect you spiritually.”

Read on: Rolling Stone

"A poignant moment occurs near the end of the first episode of “Cosmos: A Spacetime Odyssey,” a rollicking 13-part tour of the universe to be broadcast on Fox starting on Sunday.
Sitting on a rock by the Pacific, Neil deGrasse Tyson, host of the show and director of the Hayden Planetarium in New York City, pulls out an old desk calendar that had belonged to Carl Sagan, the Cornell astronomer and author. On a date in 1975 he finds his own name. The most famous astronomer in the land had invited young Neil, then a high school student in the Bronx with a passion for astronomy, to spend a day in Ithaca.
Dr. Sagan kindly offered to put him up for the night if his bus didn’t come. As Dr. Tyson told the story, he already knew he wanted to be an astronomer, but that day, he said, “I learned from Carl the kind of person I wanted to be.” …
After a series of special showings this week, including one at the White House, it will be shown in 170 countries and 45 languages, on Fox and on the National Geographic Channel — the largest global opening ever for a television series, according to Ann Druyan, Dr. Sagan’s widow and his collaborator on the original “Cosmos,” who is an executive producer and a writer and director of the new series.
I’m not going to pretend to be neutral here. I hope it succeeds and that everyone watches it, not just because I have known Ms. Druyan and admired Dr. Tyson for years, but because we all need a unifying dose of curiosity and wonder. …
We could use a national conversation that is not about scandal or sports.”
"Much of the first episode consists of a tour of the solar system and then outward as Dr. Tyson fills out what he calls our long address:
Earth.
Solar system.
Milky Way galaxy.
Local Group.
Virgo supercluster.
Observable universe.
And we get to hop along a cosmic calendar in which the 13.8-billion-year history of the universe has been compressed to 365 days and it’s now midnight on New Year’s Eve.
On this scale, Dr. Tyson reports, the sun was born on Aug. 31, and the dinosaurs died yesterday morning in that asteroid blast. Everybody you ever heard of, all the kings and queens and prophets, lived in the last 14 seconds of this cosmic year. ‘Jesus was born five seconds ago,’ he goes on.
'In the last second we began to do science,' he concludes. 'It allowed us to discover where and when we are in the cosmos.'
This is going to be fun.”
A Successor to Sagan Reboots Cosmos

"A poignant moment occurs near the end of the first episode of “Cosmos: A Spacetime Odyssey,” a rollicking 13-part tour of the universe to be broadcast on Fox starting on Sunday.

Sitting on a rock by the Pacific, Neil deGrasse Tyson, host of the show and director of the Hayden Planetarium in New York City, pulls out an old desk calendar that had belonged to Carl Sagan, the Cornell astronomer and author. On a date in 1975 he finds his own name. The most famous astronomer in the land had invited young Neil, then a high school student in the Bronx with a passion for astronomy, to spend a day in Ithaca.

Dr. Sagan kindly offered to put him up for the night if his bus didn’t come. As Dr. Tyson told the story, he already knew he wanted to be an astronomer, but that day, he said, “I learned from Carl the kind of person I wanted to be.” …

After a series of special showings this week, including one at the White House, it will be shown in 170 countries and 45 languages, on Fox and on the National Geographic Channel — the largest global opening ever for a television series, according to Ann Druyan, Dr. Sagan’s widow and his collaborator on the original “Cosmos,” who is an executive producer and a writer and director of the new series.

I’m not going to pretend to be neutral here. I hope it succeeds and that everyone watches it, not just because I have known Ms. Druyan and admired Dr. Tyson for years, but because we all need a unifying dose of curiosity and wonder. …

We could use a national conversation that is not about scandal or sports.”

"Much of the first episode consists of a tour of the solar system and then outward as Dr. Tyson fills out what he calls our long address:

Earth.

Solar system.

Milky Way galaxy.

Local Group.

Virgo supercluster.

Observable universe.

And we get to hop along a cosmic calendar in which the 13.8-billion-year history of the universe has been compressed to 365 days and it’s now midnight on New Year’s Eve.

On this scale, Dr. Tyson reports, the sun was born on Aug. 31, and the dinosaurs died yesterday morning in that asteroid blast. Everybody you ever heard of, all the kings and queens and prophets, lived in the last 14 seconds of this cosmic year. ‘Jesus was born five seconds ago,’ he goes on.

'In the last second we began to do science,' he concludes. 'It allowed us to discover where and when we are in the cosmos.'

This is going to be fun.

A Successor to Sagan Reboots Cosmos

“The problem, often not discovered until late in life, is that when you look for things like love, meaning, motivation, it implies they are sitting behind a tree or under a rock. The most successful people recognize, that in life they create their own love, they manufacture their own meaning, they generate their own motivation.”

Neil deGrasse Tyson


Create.

Manufacture.

Generate.

©2011 Kateoplis