black holes and gray matter. in one thousand tangos.

             

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Three covers for the viral campaign I shot for Catapult.org

Even in 2014, the rights of women and girls are severely threatened by sex trafficking, slavery, child marriage and other violations around the world. International Women’s Day, observed annually on March 8, continues to spread awareness and garner support — and change — for women across the globe.

Catapult, a crowdfunding site dedicated specifically to the advancement of women and girls, has released a startling new visual campaign in an attempt to make this year’s IWD “more than just a cover story.” The Cover Stories campaign features three mock magazine covers that highlight terrifyingly real human rights issues to push the conversation forward.

The magazines display the grisly names Child Bride, Good Slavekeeping and Thirteen — wordplays on the popular magazines Brides, Good Housekeeping and Seventeen, respectively.

Headlines such as "The Wedding You’ll Never Forget But Wish You Could" and "Who Needs a Childhood Anyway?" float next to the young models. The cover of Good Slavekeeping pretends to cater to the human rights violators themselves, adding another dark layer to the already serious campaign.

(via nikolatamindzic)

“Prison turned out to be not nearly as bad as I expected… We have a vastly different justice system today than we had a generation ago, with an order of magnitude of more people in prison, and one of the things that people don’t stop and think about, is that one of the consequences of mass incarceration is that our prison are filled with really normal people. Mass incarceration did not happen because of some drastic shift in human nature. It happend because the private prison industry was able to change our laws that allows us to lock up a lot more normal people.”
Climate activist Tim DeChristopher on Letterman
Gabrielle Giffords & Mark Kelly: Our new campaign will launch a national dialogue and raise funds to counter influence of the gun lobby

Special interests purporting to represent gun owners but really advancing the interests of an ideological fringe have used big money and influence to cow Congress into submission. Rather than working to find the balance between our rights and the regulation of a dangerous product, these groups have cast simple protections for our communities as existential threats to individual liberties. Rather than conducting a dialogue, they threaten those who divert from their orthodoxy with political extinction.

As a result, we are more vulnerable to gun violence. Weapons designed for the battlefield have a home in our streets. Criminals and the mentally ill can easily purchase guns by avoiding background checks. Firearm accessories designed for killing at a high rate are legal and widely available. And gun owners are less responsible for the misuse of their weapons than they are for their automobiles.

Forget the boogeyman of big, bad government coming to dispossess you of your firearms. As a Western woman and a Persian Gulf War combat veteran who have exercised our Second Amendment rights, we don’t want to take away your guns any more than we want to give up the two guns we have locked in a safe at home. What we do want is what the majority of NRA members and other Americans want: responsible changes in our laws to require responsible gun ownership and reduce gun violence.

We saw from the NRA leadership’s defiant and unsympathetic response to the Newtown, Conn., massacre that winning even the most common-sense reforms will require a fight. But whether it has been in campaigns or in Congress, in combat or in space, fighting for what we believe in has always been what we do.”

Read on: Americans for Responsible Solutions

“How does it feel seeing all these articles about your son?”

"I feel very proud, because he speaks for the average citizen…. [although] I wish he would just be an artist. One person cannot solve the problems of the whole country. But, if everyone ignores the country’s problems, what will happen?”
Ai Weiwei's mother from Ai Weiwei: Never Sorry 
©2011 Kateoplis