black holes and gray matter. in one thousand tangos.

             

2014 Festival de Cannes

Jane Campion - the only female director to have won the Palme d’or for The Piano (1993) - will preside over the Jury of the 67th Festival de Cannes, and the Cinéfondation and Short Films Jury will be presided by Abbas Kiarostami

The Official Selection announced today, include new work from David CronenbergJean-Luc GodardOlivier AssayasAtom Egoyan, and Wim Wenders. Also In Competition are Ryan Gosling’s directorial debut, Lost Riverstarring Christina Hendricks and Eva Mendes, and The Homesman, an offbeat western by Tommy Lee Jones starring Hillary Swank and Meryl Streep. 

Films of female directors include: Asia Argento’s Incompresa, starring Charlotte Gainsbourg; Alice Rohrwacher’s Le Meraviglie, starring Monica Bellucci; Naomi Kawase's Futatsume no Mado, starring Hideo Sakaki; and July Jung’s A Girl at My Door, starring Doona Bae.

And finally, Wim Wenders will present a restoration of his Palme d’Or winner, Paris, Texas, in celebration of its 30th anniversary.

Here’s the full lineup for the 67th Cannes

“Say Anything is 25 years old, as are all the unfulfilled hopes and aspirations of your youth, including but not limited to the dream you had of making a difference in the lives of people other than your friends and family and the vague ideas that at some point in your life the work you would be doing would have meaning in and of itself and not merely be the thing you dragged yourself into each morning because you became a prisoner to status and possessions and the ever-increasing series of compromises and “temporary” positions you took with the delusion that you would only do those things until you got yourself to a place where you were able to follow your bliss, and now when you look back on that idealistic kid from 1989 you are stricken with a mixture of disgust for the ignorance of youth and sadness about the hard realities of life. But of course this is only true for people of a certain age; if you are much younger, don’t worry, I’m sure everything will work out exactly the way you expect it to.”
Movie Old

Say Anything is 25 years old, as are all the unfulfilled hopes and aspirations of your youth, including but not limited to the dream you had of making a difference in the lives of people other than your friends and family and the vague ideas that at some point in your life the work you would be doing would have meaning in and of itself and not merely be the thing you dragged yourself into each morning because you became a prisoner to status and possessions and the ever-increasing series of compromises and “temporary” positions you took with the delusion that you would only do those things until you got yourself to a place where you were able to follow your bliss, and now when you look back on that idealistic kid from 1989 you are stricken with a mixture of disgust for the ignorance of youth and sadness about the hard realities of life. But of course this is only true for people of a certain age; if you are much younger, don’t worry, I’m sure everything will work out exactly the way you expect it to.

Movie Old

"[B]efore Tilda Swinton was this strapping space aristocrat, or pensive movie star, or fabulously tailored fashion hologram with an ever-mutating, post­-human ­coiffure (it’s mixed with yak hair in Only Lovers), she was, like many of us, someone avoiding a set of expectations laid down before her. Swinton is the descendant of a medieval clan of Anglo-Scot toffs, a tall, clever girl sent away early to boarding school (where she studied for a while alongside the future Princess Diana), the daughter of a major general in the Scots Guards who was expected to, as she understood it at the time, not be too freaky, or too much ­herself, for that ­matter—whoever she was exactly—and probably, as she once joked, marry a duke.
Regal, then, comes as naturally to her as her clipped upper-caste accent. But she has also become very much her own exquisite thing, only attaining widespread fame in her 40s (in part for being this in extremis beauty), just as more ­ingénue types are in panicky plastic-surgery ­shoring-up mode. Everyone describes her as a space oddity—related: the Tumblr (­TildaStardust) dedicated to the zany notion she and David Bowie are actually the same person—and it’s easy to see her as the alabaster ambassador from a more advanced corner of the galaxy. She talks about her friends as her heroes, whose faces “are lining my space capsule that is hurtling through space.” 
Hell, send her an email and the auto-reply you get back says: 
'Hello, I am away until 01/01/2070 and am unable to read your message.'”
Tilda Swinton Is Not Quite of This World

"[B]efore Tilda Swinton was this strapping space aristocrat, or pensive movie star, or fabulously tailored fashion hologram with an ever-mutating, post­-human ­coiffure (it’s mixed with yak hair in Only Lovers), she was, like many of us, someone avoiding a set of expectations laid down before her. Swinton is the descendant of a medieval clan of Anglo-Scot toffs, a tall, clever girl sent away early to boarding school (where she studied for a while alongside the future Princess Diana), the daughter of a major general in the Scots Guards who was expected to, as she understood it at the time, not be too freaky, or too much ­herself, for that ­matter—whoever she was exactly—and probably, as she once joked, marry a duke.

Regal, then, comes as naturally to her as her clipped upper-caste accent. But she has also become very much her own exquisite thing, only attaining widespread fame in her 40s (in part for being this in extremis beauty), just as more ­ingénue types are in panicky plastic-surgery ­shoring-up mode. Everyone describes her as a space oddity—related: the Tumblr (­TildaStardust) dedicated to the zany notion she and David Bowie are actually the same person—and it’s easy to see her as the alabaster ambassador from a more advanced corner of the galaxy. She talks about her friends as her heroes, whose faces “are lining my space capsule that is hurtling through space.”

Hell, send her an email and the auto-reply you get back says:

'Hello, I am away until 01/01/2070 and am unable to read your message.'”

Tilda Swinton Is Not Quite of This World

“Jim Jarmusch is old school. He writes all his scripts out by hand and then dictates them to a typist. Ideas are jotted down in small, color-coordinated notebooks and, despite the presence of an iPad and iPhone in his life, he doesn’t have email. ‘I don’t have enough time as it is to read a book or make music, or see my friends… no, I do not have email.’ …
Jarmusch could be called vampiric, too, and not just for his predominantly black wardrobe and movie-villain-like nimbus of silver hair, which he has styled and cut himself since he was a boy. At 61, he still has an unquenched cultural thirst: old school but with a tremendous jones for new (or new-to-him) projects. …
More than three decades into filmmaking, Mr. Jarmusch remains the rare indie director who achieved critical success (and four prizes at Cannes) and enough prestige to cast bankable movie stars like Cate Blanchett and Johnny Depp, and yet never made a move toward Hollywood, never even leapt at directing a commercial. Instead he has maintained, in movies and music, his own wry, rad vision. …
Coming projects include a quasi-documentary about the Stooges (“a little poetic essay,” Mr. Jarmusch said); an opera about Nikola Tesla, in collaboration with his friend the composer Phil Kline and the international director Robert Wilson; and another feature, about a bus driver and poet in Paterson, N.J., that Mr. Jarmusch wrote in the years he waited for “Only Lovers” to come together.
'I take on a lot more now,' he said, partly out of age, experience and desire, and partly out of professional gumption. …
[A]s an aficionado of decay, he has, of course, imagined his own demise.
The Zoroastrians, an ancient Iranian religious group, ‘get eaten by vultures,’ he said. ‘They put their dead bodies on a mountaintop, and they get eaten. I would love that.’”
This Time, Jim Jarmusch is Kissing Vampires 

Jim Jarmusch is old school. He writes all his scripts out by hand and then dictates them to a typist. Ideas are jotted down in small, color-coordinated notebooks and, despite the presence of an iPad and iPhone in his life, he doesn’t have email. ‘I don’t have enough time as it is to read a book or make music, or see my friends… no, I do not have email.’ …

Jarmusch could be called vampiric, too, and not just for his predominantly black wardrobe and movie-villain-like nimbus of silver hair, which he has styled and cut himself since he was a boy. At 61, he still has an unquenched cultural thirst: old school but with a tremendous jones for new (or new-to-him) projects. …

More than three decades into filmmaking, Mr. Jarmusch remains the rare indie director who achieved critical success (and four prizes at Cannes) and enough prestige to cast bankable movie stars like Cate Blanchett and Johnny Depp, and yet never made a move toward Hollywood, never even leapt at directing a commercial. Instead he has maintained, in movies and music, his own wry, rad vision. …

Coming projects include a quasi-documentary about the Stooges (“a little poetic essay,” Mr. Jarmusch said); an opera about Nikola Tesla, in collaboration with his friend the composer Phil Kline and the international director Robert Wilson; and another feature, about a bus driver and poet in Paterson, N.J., that Mr. Jarmusch wrote in the years he waited for “Only Lovers” to come together.

'I take on a lot more now,' he said, partly out of age, experience and desire, and partly out of professional gumption. …

[A]s an aficionado of decay, he has, of course, imagined his own demise.

The Zoroastrians, an ancient Iranian religious group, ‘get eaten by vultures,’ he said. ‘They put their dead bodies on a mountaintop, and they get eaten. I would love that.’”

This Time, Jim Jarmusch is Kissing Vampires 

In the music business, Napster’s vision eventually became a reality. Today, with services like Spotify and Rdio, you can pay a monthly fee to listen to whatever you want, whenever you want. But in the movie and TV business, such a glorious future isn’t in the offing anytime soon. …

[F]or now, the Internet has met its match: Hollywood. …

The main reason you won’t see a comprehensive, all-you-can-eat movie plan soon is something called “windowing,” the entertainment industry term for the staggered way movies are released to various outlets.

Like salmon, Hollywood movies are governed by rigid life cycles. First, a movie is released in theaters. A few months later, it heads to second-run outlets like airlines and hotel pay-per-view, and later it goes to Blu-ray, DVD and digital services that allow you to purchase or rent films à la carte.

Then, about a year after a film’s theatrical release, trouble kicks in. That’s when a movie is made available to pay-TV channels like HBO, Starz and Epix. These premium periods are exclusive; when a movie gets to a pay channel, it often can’t be shown on any other streaming service. … 

Windowing also explains why Netflix’s movies feel so old. It takes about five to seven years after a movie first hits theaters for all its pay-window restrictions to expire. Only then does it become available to all-you-can eat services like Netflix. …Why are movies released in this staggered way? And why can’t the system change to accommodate an all-you-can-eat plan? Money, of course.

HBO and other premium networks have agreed to pay billions of dollars for the exclusive run of major studio films. HBO has said that, despite the cultural cachet of its original programs, movies are its most popular content; consequently, it has purchased rights to about half of all the movies released by major studios in the United States until beyond 2020.

At least in this decade, then, a monthly movie plan that offers all of the movies isn’t going to happen.”

Movie Streaming Services Will Continue to Blow (meanwhile in Appleland)

©2011 Kateoplis