black holes and gray matter. in one thousand tangos.

             
humansofnewyork:

Wanted to share with you guys a letter I got today, because I think it’s a testament to the community of people who follow this blog. I’ve also attached the photo/caption referenced in the letter. I get nervous as the blog grows that the culture will fall apart, but with 2.7 million and counting— the HONY comment section remains a sort of rare internet jewel where everyone, for the most part, is really nice. And when there is a mean comment, it sticks out as an anomaly, instead of the other way around. So thanks for that.
Hi Brandon, 
I’m Ted, we met getting off the Six at Grand Central. When I got home Sunday evening, I had an e-mail from friends in Chicago. One of their daughters reads your blog (is that what it is called?), and recognized me even though she has never seen me with a beard. I am astounded! I’ve read about 1000 of the comments, words cannot express how touched I am by what I have read. Its actually more than touched, it has been very emotional to read the wonderful things people have said. A couple people appear confused about what happened, for the record she had acute myelogenous leukemia, we were diagnosed July 2008, we lost our battle February 20 2013, not quite a year ago. Thanks for doing this, it has really touched my life. The most wonderful people in the world read your material and comment on it. 
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"At first we kept saying: ‘We’re going to beat it. We’re going to beat it.’ Then after awhile we began to realize that we might not beat it. Then toward the end, it became clear that we definitely weren’t going to beat it. That’s when she started telling me that she wanted me to move on and find happiness with somebody else. But I’m not quite there yet. Not long ago a noise woke me up in the middle of the night, and I rolled over to ask if she needed anything."

humansofnewyork:

Wanted to share with you guys a letter I got today, because I think it’s a testament to the community of people who follow this blog. I’ve also attached the photo/caption referenced in the letter. I get nervous as the blog grows that the culture will fall apart, but with 2.7 million and counting— the HONY comment section remains a sort of rare internet jewel where everyone, for the most part, is really nice. And when there is a mean comment, it sticks out as an anomaly, instead of the other way around. So thanks for that.

Hi Brandon, 

I’m Ted, we met getting off the Six at Grand Central. When I got home Sunday evening, I had an e-mail from friends in Chicago. One of their daughters reads your blog (is that what it is called?), and recognized me even though she has never seen me with a beard. I am astounded! I’ve read about 1000 of the comments, words cannot express how touched I am by what I have read. Its actually more than touched, it has been very emotional to read the wonderful things people have said. A couple people appear confused about what happened, for the record she had acute myelogenous leukemia, we were diagnosed July 2008, we lost our battle February 20 2013, not quite a year ago. Thanks for doing this, it has really touched my life. The most wonderful people in the world read your material and comment on it. 

———————————-

"At first we kept saying: ‘We’re going to beat it. We’re going to beat it.’ Then after awhile we began to realize that we might not beat it. Then toward the end, it became clear that we definitely weren’t going to beat it. That’s when she started telling me that she wanted me to move on and find happiness with somebody else. But I’m not quite there yet. Not long ago a noise woke me up in the middle of the night, and I rolled over to ask if she needed anything."

1. “I really don’t have time to talk, these shadows are changing every second.”

2. "I’m 99 years old. Everything from my neck down is shit. But everything from my neck is just as good as everyone else’s. How lucky is that?" 

3. "These two were watching clouds in Washington Square Park, just like this."

4. "This mural was housed on a vacant lot surrounded by a huge chain-link fence. I asked several young men to follow me through a hole in the fence, but nobody was willing to take the risk. After several minutes, I finally found two people with the balls to do it"

Humans of New York featured on the Guardian

"I am one of the officers in this picture. My friend found it in your book and pointed it out to me. The victim under the sheet was a woman in her late fifties. She was Miss Austria in her early 20’s and a contestant in the Miss World pageant. At the time of her death she was destitute and alone, but still carried her passport with a photo of her at the peak of her beauty. She was stunning. On October 22nd of last year, wandering the halls of the building she had chosen for her last act, she had looked for an open window at the record company that produces Maroon Five. Asked to leave, she found one a floor above in a hallway, took sleeping pills, sat on the ledge in the sunlight for about ten minutes, then leaned forward. Anyway, thanks for the photo. It is one of those souvenirs of one’s life that come to be valuable because it has unexpectedly captured a moment of you doing your life’s work, genuine and unrehearsed."
Humans of New York

"I am one of the officers in this picture. My friend found it in your book and pointed it out to me. The victim under the sheet was a woman in her late fifties. She was Miss Austria in her early 20’s and a contestant in the Miss World pageant. At the time of her death she was destitute and alone, but still carried her passport with a photo of her at the peak of her beauty. She was stunning. On October 22nd of last year, wandering the halls of the building she had chosen for her last act, she had looked for an open window at the record company that produces Maroon Five. Asked to leave, she found one a floor above in a hallway, took sleeping pills, sat on the ledge in the sunlight for about ten minutes, then leaned forward. Anyway, thanks for the photo. It is one of those souvenirs of one’s life that come to be valuable because it has unexpectedly captured a moment of you doing your life’s work, genuine and unrehearsed."

Humans of New York

©2011 Kateoplis