black holes and gray matter. in one thousand tangos.

             

The wearing of the hijab is enforced in part by a volunteer citizens’ militia, the Basij, as well as what are called the ‘guidance’ police. They roam the popular streets of Tehran and other Iranian cities, monitoring religious observance.

Improper dress code, including insufficient coverage of a woman’s head, shoulders and chest in public is officially illegal and can incur arrest and fines. Though Iran’s new president, Hassan Rouhani, whom many see as a moderate and a reformer, has said publicly that guidance on women’s dress code should be encouraged through education rather than enforced by the police, secular Iranian women continue to face censure for insufficiently modest dress.”

Hossein Fatemi | NYT

11 Persian-American Artists Bringing Iran to the U.S. | Vanity Fair

1. Artist, photographer, and filmmaker Shirin Neshat, named “Artist of the Decade” in 2010.

2. Nina Seirafi, named one of Architectural Digest’s top 100 interior designers in the world (the “AD100”) in 2010.

3. The bisexual writer-director-actress Desiree Akhavan, hailed as “the next Lena Dunham” by the New York Post. Her debut film, Appropriate Behavior, a comic and sexually graphic story of coming out, premiered at Sundance this year.

4. Nariman Hamed, the son of actress Fatemeh Motamed-Arya, “the Meryl Streep of Iran,” is directing a documentary, Shirin, about the artist Shirin Neshat, with animation by Persepolis author Marjane Satrapi.

5. Nima Behnoud got his start re-designing jeans that had been dropped by the Red Cross on the Iran-Iraq border during the Iran-Iraq war. Now, Heidi Klum and other celebrities wear his calligraphy-laced clothing brand, Nimany. His Web site has been banned in Iran.

6. Hafez Nazeri, the son of Iran’s most prominent classical musician, Shahram Nazeri, is a composer who brings East and West together in hauntingly beautiful orchestral pieces. His fifth album, Untold, released by Sony March 11, was recorded in five countries with more than 35 Grammy Award-winning artists.

7. Habibi, the retro, all-girl, punk-rock band, based in Brooklyn, fronted by Rahill Jamalifard.

CIA Admits It Was Behind Iran’s Coup
The agency finally owns up to its role in the 1953 operation.
“Sixty years ago this Monday, on August 19, 1953, modern Iranian history took a critical turn when a U.S.- and British-backed coup overthrew the country’s prime minister, Mohammed Mossadegh. The event’s reverberations have haunted its orchestrators over the years, contributing to the anti-Americanism that accompanied the Shah’s ouster in early 1979, and even influencing the Iranians who seized the U.S. Embassy in Tehran later that year.
But it has taken almost six decades for the U.S. intelligence community to acknowledge openly that it was behind the controversial overthrow. Published here today — and on the website of the National Security Archive, which obtained the document through the Freedom of Information Act — is a brief excerpt from The Battle for Iran, an internal report prepared in the mid-1970s by an in-house CIA historian.
The document was first released in 1981, but with most of it excised, including all of Section III, entitled “Covert Action” — the part that describes the coup itself. Most of that section remains under wraps, but this new version does formally make public, for the first time that we know of, the fact of the agency’s participation: “[T]he military coup that overthrew Mosadeq and his National Front cabinet was carried out under CIA direction as an act of U.S. foreign policy,” the history reads. The risk of leaving Iran “open to Soviet aggression,” it adds, “compelled the United States … in planning and executing TPAJAX.”
TPAJAX was the CIA’s codename for the overthrow plot, which relied on local collaborators at every stage. It consisted of several steps: using propaganda to undermine Mossadegh politically, inducing the Shah to cooperate, bribing members of parliament, organizing the security forces, and ginning up public demonstrations. The initial attempt actually failed, but after a mad scramble the coup forces pulled themselves together and came through on their second try, on August 19.”
Read on.
Well, well, well, whad’ya know?

CIA Admits It Was Behind Iran’s Coup

The agency finally owns up to its role in the 1953 operation.

Sixty years ago this Monday, on August 19, 1953, modern Iranian history took a critical turn when a U.S.- and British-backed coup overthrew the country’s prime minister, Mohammed Mossadegh. The event’s reverberations have haunted its orchestrators over the years, contributing to the anti-Americanism that accompanied the Shah’s ouster in early 1979, and even influencing the Iranians who seized the U.S. Embassy in Tehran later that year.

But it has taken almost six decades for the U.S. intelligence community to acknowledge openly that it was behind the controversial overthrow. Published here today — and on the website of the National Security Archive, which obtained the document through the Freedom of Information Act — is a brief excerpt from The Battle for Iran, an internal report prepared in the mid-1970s by an in-house CIA historian.

The document was first released in 1981, but with most of it excised, including all of Section III, entitled “Covert Action” — the part that describes the coup itself. Most of that section remains under wraps, but this new version does formally make public, for the first time that we know of, the fact of the agency’s participation: “[T]he military coup that overthrew Mosadeq and his National Front cabinet was carried out under CIA direction as an act of U.S. foreign policy,” the history reads. The risk of leaving Iran “open to Soviet aggression,” it adds, “compelled the United States … in planning and executing TPAJAX.”

TPAJAX was the CIA’s codename for the overthrow plot, which relied on local collaborators at every stage. It consisted of several steps: using propaganda to undermine Mossadegh politically, inducing the Shah to cooperate, bribing members of parliament, organizing the security forces, and ginning up public demonstrations. The initial attempt actually failed, but after a mad scramble the coup forces pulled themselves together and came through on their second try, on August 19.”

Read on.

Well, well, well, whad’ya know?

©2011 Kateoplis