black holes and gray matter. in one thousand tangos.

             
Lars von Trier Creates A New Film Genre
“In 2011 Lars von Trier decided to refrain from all public statements and interviews. To this date he has kept his word.
“But his stories are still being told worldwide and Nymphomaniac will be no exception.
“Using a structure known from literature Nymphomaniac consists of chapters, encapsulating both VOLUME I and VOLUME II and during the next eight months, starting from June and like domino pieces counting down to the release, small bites of these chapters will be published exclusively by a community of selected newspapers around the world.
“Each chapter teaser is defined by a headline, a still and a short narrative that playfully unveils the multilayered universe of Nymphomaniac with which Lars von Trier wants to introduce a new film genre: Digressionism.”

Lars von Trier Creates A New Film Genre

“In 2011 Lars von Trier decided to refrain from all public statements and interviews. To this date he has kept his word.

“But his stories are still being told worldwide and Nymphomaniac will be no exception.

“Using a structure known from literature Nymphomaniac consists of chapters, encapsulating both VOLUME I and VOLUME II and during the next eight months, starting from June and like domino pieces counting down to the release, small bites of these chapters will be published exclusively by a community of selected newspapers around the world.

“Each chapter teaser is defined by a headline, a still and a short narrative that playfully unveils the multilayered universe of Nymphomaniac with which Lars von Trier wants to introduce a new film genre: Digressionism.”

Lars Von Trier in October 2011 issue of GQ
gq: […] our favorite part of this completely fascinating profile—Trier is such uniquely sad, gifted, tormented artist, and perhaps our most unintentionally hilarious—is the moment when he agrees to watch the footage of his Cannes press conference that started all the fuss:
“Ayee-eeee…” he says, physically wincing, as it begins. (His  ramblings are prompted by a question partly inquiring about the interest  he had expressed to a Danish film magazine about the Nazi aesthetic and  their achievements in the field of design.) “Yeah, okay. I remember  that…” He asks me to stop it for a moment, then continues.  “Terrible…” He sees the distressed look on Dunst’s face, helpless to  stop the flow of disastrous words from the mouth of someone inches away  from her. “I kind of didn’t look at her,” he remembers. “But I had a  feeling that she was kind of reacting. But then I thought ‘Ah, these  Americans, they’re always so scared of everything, you know…’ “ 

"Ah, these Americans, they’re always so scared of everything, you know…"

Lars Von Trier in October 2011 issue of GQ

gq: […] our favorite part of this completely fascinating profile—Trier is such uniquely sad, gifted, tormented artist, and perhaps our most unintentionally hilarious—is the moment when he agrees to watch the footage of his Cannes press conference that started all the fuss:
“Ayee-eeee…” he says, physically wincing, as it begins. (His ramblings are prompted by a question partly inquiring about the interest he had expressed to a Danish film magazine about the Nazi aesthetic and their achievements in the field of design.) “Yeah, okay. I remember that…” He asks me to stop it for a moment, then continues. “Terrible…” He sees the distressed look on Dunst’s face, helpless to stop the flow of disastrous words from the mouth of someone inches away from her. “I kind of didn’t look at her,” he remembers. “But I had a feeling that she was kind of reacting. But then I thought ‘Ah, these Americans, they’re always so scared of everything, you know…’ “ 

"Ah, these Americans, they’re always so scared of everything, you know…"

Cannes #5: Lars von Trier

There’s electricity in the air. Every seat is filled, even the little fold-down seats at the end of every row. It is the first screening of Lars von Trier’s Antichrist, and we are ready for anything. We’d better be. Von Trier’s film goes beyond malevolence into the monstrous. Never before have a man and woman inflicted more pain upon each other in a movie. We looked in disbelief. There were piteous groans. Sometimes a voice would cry out, “No!” At certain moments there was nervous laughter. When it was all over, we staggered up the aisles. Manohla Dargis, the merry film critic of The New York Times, confided that she left softly singing “That’s Entertainment!”

Whether this is a bad, good or great film is entirely beside the point. It is an audacious spit in the eye of society. It says we harbor an undreamed-of capacity for evil. It transforms a psychological treatment into torture undreamed of in the dungeons of history. Torturers might have been capable of such actions, but they would have lacked the imagination. Von Trier is not so much making a film about violence as making a film to inflict violence upon us, perhaps as a salutary experience. It’s been reported that he suffered from depression during and after the film. You can tell. This is the most despairing film I have ever seen.

If, as they say, you are not prepared for “disturbing images,” I advise you to stop reading now. Or, go on.

- Roger Ebert

Every LVT film has been “an audacious spit in the eye of society”. I can’t wait.

©2011 Kateoplis