black holes and gray matter. in one thousand tangos.

             
"Medical cannabis is too dangerous to recommend as a medicine
As acknowledged by no less than the DEA’s own administrative law judge, “Marijuana, in its natural form, is one of the safest therapeutically active substances known to man.”
No major medical or health organizations support medical marijuana access 
Numerous medical and health organizations – such as the American Nurses Association, the American Public Health Association, and the Epilepsy Foundation of America – support allowing qualified patients to legally access to cannabis therapy. Most practicing physicians do too. According to survey data released this year by WebMD/Medscape, nearly 70 percent of doctors, including over 80 percent of oncologists and hematologists, acknowledge the therapeutic qualities of cannabis…”
"Medical cannabis laws are associated with increased crime
Not so concludes a study published earlier this year in the scientific journal PLoS ONE. Investigators tracked crime rates across all 50 states in the years between 1990 and 2006, during which time 11 states legalized medical cannabis access… “The central finding…was that MML (medical marijuana legalization) is not predictive of higher crime rates and may be related to reductions in rates of homicide and assault.”
"Medical cannabis laws increase pot use by adolescents
Wrong again.”
"Cannabis isn’t medicine because the FDA has not approved its therapeutic use
The FDA evaluates patented, synthetic products developed by private companies. It does not evaluate naturally occurring botanical products such as cannabis. Of course, that is not to say that the plant, in particular a standardized variety of the herb, could not arguably meet the conventional FDA standards of safety and efficacy. After all, humans have consumed cannabis for thousands of years and it possesses adequate safety profile. Further, its therapeutic utility is demonstrated in numerous controlled trials. Arguably, by any objective analysis, cannabis and cannabinoids exceed the FDA’s existing standards for safety and efficacy.”
10 biggest pot myths, debunked by science | Salon

"Medical cannabis is too dangerous to recommend as a medicine

As acknowledged by no less than the DEA’s own administrative law judge, “Marijuana, in its natural form, is one of the safest therapeutically active substances known to man.”

No major medical or health organizations support medical marijuana access 

Numerous medical and health organizations – such as the American Nurses Association, the American Public Health Association, and the Epilepsy Foundation of America – support allowing qualified patients to legally access to cannabis therapy. Most practicing physicians do too. According to survey data released this year by WebMD/Medscape, nearly 70 percent of doctors, including over 80 percent of oncologists and hematologists, acknowledge the therapeutic qualities of cannabis…”

"Medical cannabis laws are associated with increased crime

Not so concludes a study published earlier this year in the scientific journal PLoS ONE. Investigators tracked crime rates across all 50 states in the years between 1990 and 2006, during which time 11 states legalized medical cannabis access… “The central finding…was that MML (medical marijuana legalization) is not predictive of higher crime rates and may be related to reductions in rates of homicide and assault.”

"Medical cannabis laws increase pot use by adolescents

Wrong again.”

"Cannabis isn’t medicine because the FDA has not approved its therapeutic use

The FDA evaluates patented, synthetic products developed by private companies. It does not evaluate naturally occurring botanical products such as cannabis. Of course, that is not to say that the plant, in particular a standardized variety of the herb, could not arguably meet the conventional FDA standards of safety and efficacy. After all, humans have consumed cannabis for thousands of years and it possesses adequate safety profile. Further, its therapeutic utility is demonstrated in numerous controlled trials. Arguably, by any objective analysis, cannabis and cannabinoids exceed the FDA’s existing standards for safety and efficacy.”

10 biggest pot myths, debunked by science | Salon

For the science and technology set, it’s a classic opportunity to disrupt an industry historically run by hippies and gangsters. And the entire tech-industrial complex is getting in on the action: investors, entrepreneurs, biotechnologists, scientists, industrial designers, electrical engineers, data analysts, software developers. Industry types with experience at Apple and Juniper and Silicon Valley Bank and Zynga and all manner of other companies are flocking to cannabis with the hopes of creating a breakout product for a burgeoning legitimate industry. Maybe it’s the Firefly. Maybe it’s something still being developed in someone’s living room. There’s a truism about the gold rush days of San Francisco: It wasn’t the miners who got rich; it was the people selling picks and shovels. As the legalization trend picks up steam, Silicon Valley thinks it can make a better shovel.”

How Silicon Valley entrepreneurs are rushing to cash in on CannabisWIRED 

"For the first time ever, many of the farmers who supply Mexican drug cartels have stopped planting marijuana …
Facing stiff competition from pot grown legally and illegally north of the border, the price for a kilogram of Mexican schwag has plummeted by 75 percent, from $100 to $25, the Post reports:

Farmers in the storied “Golden Triangle” region of Mexico’s Sinaloa state, which has produced the country’s most notorious gangsters and biggest marijuana harvests, say they are no longer planting the crop…increasingly, they’re unable to compete with US marijuana growers. With cannabis legalized or allowed for medical use in 20 US states and the District of Columbia, more and more of the American market is supplied with highly potent marijuana grown in American garages and converted warehouses—some licensed, others not.

American Pot Farmers Are Putting Mexican Cartels Out Of Business

"For the first time ever, many of the farmers who supply Mexican drug cartels have stopped planting marijuana

Facing stiff competition from pot grown legally and illegally north of the border, the price for a kilogram of Mexican schwag has plummeted by 75 percent, from $100 to $25, the Post reports:

Farmers in the storied “Golden Triangle” region of Mexico’s Sinaloa state, which has produced the country’s most notorious gangsters and biggest marijuana harvests, say they are no longer planting the crop…increasingly, they’re unable to compete with US marijuana growers. With cannabis legalized or allowed for medical use in 20 US states and the District of Columbia, more and more of the American market is supplied with highly potent marijuana grown in American garages and converted warehouses—some licensed, others not.

American Pot Farmers Are Putting Mexican Cartels Out Of Business

“So far 20 states and the District of Columbia have legalized the use of marijuana for medical or recreational purposes, but with the rise of the legal pot business has come a wave of robberies and other crimes targeting pot dispensaries and their owners. The purveyors of legal pot are a major crime magnet, in part because they largely operate on a cash-only basis. And that’s due to the fact that most banks and credit card firms refuse to work with these businesses for fear of being prosecuted under federal law, where the sale of pot remains illegal. …

MrJones is one of the three founders of PotCoin, which launched earlier this year. They have so far kept their identities secret, but they are developers who claim to have nationally recognized startups under their belts. They’re planning to unmask themselves at a cryptocurrency convention in April. 
'I guess anyone with an MBA and a love for crypto could have seen the opportunity, …This is an industry stigmatized unjustly for too long, first by lawmakers way back, now by bankers…Our business model is woven into the fabric of the loyal community, the commodity at large and the industry under attack.​’ 
PotCoin works similarly to bitcoin, the most popular digital currency. Someone interested in buying or selling marijuana starts by downloading an online “wallet.” There are then three ways to fill that wallet with PotCoins: People can pay you with the currency, you can purchase it on an exchange using bitcoin or US dollars, or you can ‘mine’ new PotCoins (a complicated process that is described in more detail here). The current exchange rate for PotCoin, as of March 24, is about .00179 PotCoins per $1. The transaction fee for using PotCoins is negligible, and MrJones claims that PotCoin’stransaction time is considerably faster than bitcoin’s. (A bitcoin purchase can take up to an hour to process.) The goal, he says, is for PotCoin to be as easy to use as swiping a credit card.”
Enter the PotCoin | MoJo

So far 20 states and the District of Columbia have legalized the use of marijuana for medical or recreational purposes, but with the rise of the legal pot business has come a wave of robberies and other crimes targeting pot dispensaries and their owners. The purveyors of legal pot are a major crime magnet, in part because they largely operate on a cash-only basis. And that’s due to the fact that most banks and credit card firms refuse to work with these businesses for fear of being prosecuted under federal law, where the sale of pot remains illegal. …

MrJones is one of the three founders of PotCoin, which launched earlier this year. They have so far kept their identities secret, but they are developers who claim to have nationally recognized startups under their belts. They’re planning to unmask themselves at a cryptocurrency convention in April

'I guess anyone with an MBA and a love for crypto could have seen the opportunity, …This is an industry stigmatized unjustly for too long, first by lawmakers way back, now by bankers…Our business model is woven into the fabric of the loyal community, the commodity at large and the industry under attack.​’ 

PotCoin works similarly to bitcoin, the most popular digital currency. Someone interested in buying or selling marijuana starts by downloading an online “wallet.” There are then three ways to fill that wallet with PotCoins: People can pay you with the currency, you can purchase it on an exchange using bitcoin or US dollars, or you can ‘mine’ new PotCoins (a complicated process that is described in more detail here). The current exchange rate for PotCoin, as of March 24, is about .00179 PotCoins per $1. The transaction fee for using PotCoins is negligible, and MrJones claims that PotCoin’stransaction time is considerably faster than bitcoin’s. (A bitcoin purchase can take up to an hour to process.) The goal, he says, is for PotCoin to be as easy to use as swiping a credit card.”

Enter the PotCoin | MoJo

Washington State to Start Selling Pot in June
Washington State Liquor Board has received a total of 7,046 applications, with 2,206 for retail which they will limit to 334.
The cannabis will be priced at $3 per gram for producers, $6 for processors and a pre-tax $12 per gram for retailers. “The board anticipates tax revenue of up to $2 billion during the first five years as a result of a 25% tax on each level. That’s right, ultimately this cannabis will have been taxed 75% by the time it reaches the customer.”

Washington State to Start Selling Pot in June

Washington State Liquor Board has received a total of 7,046 applications, with 2,206 for retail which they will limit to 334.

The cannabis will be priced at $3 per gram for producers, $6 for processors and a pre-tax $12 per gram for retailers. “The board anticipates tax revenue of up to $2 billion during the first five years as a result of a 25% tax on each level. That’s right, ultimately this cannabis will have been taxed 75% by the time it reaches the customer.”

“Nearly half of U.S. states have legalized marijuana in some form, whether medical or recreational. But marijuana remains illegal under federal law, and as a result, the legitimate businesses selling the drug are subject to sky-high tax rates.
Dispensaries can’t deduct traditional business expenses like advertising costs, employee payroll, rent and health insurance from their combined federal and state taxes. That means dispensary owners around the U.S. often face effective tax rates of 50 to 60 percent — and in some states, those rates soar to 80 percent or higher …
In other words, the federal government rakes in tax revenue from pot shops while prohibiting them from accessing the same financial benefits afforded to non-cannabis businesses. …
Federal tax code 280E, an antiquated Internal Revenue Service rule enacted in the 1980s under President Ronald Reagan’s War on Drugs campaign, explicitly prohibits any deduction from any business that ‘consists of trafficking in controlled substances.’ Marijuana is currently listed alongside heroin and LSD as a Schedule I narcotic under the Controlled Substances Act. …
'All we want is to be treated like other businesses,' said Mike Elliott, executive director for the Medical Marijuana Industry Group which represents marijuana businesses in Colorado. 'The federal government doesn’t recognize our businesses as being legitimate, but they do demand our taxes. It’s really unfair treatment.' …
“More than one dispensary owner, who requested anonymity when speaking about specific financial issues, told HuffPost that they estimated by the end of the year, they’ll be paying more than $1 million in sales tax to the federal government. And for some businesses, that tax is in cash.”
“More than a dozen states are expected to legalize marijuana in the the coming years. One recent study has projected a $10 billion legal marijuana industry nationwide by 2018.”
The Feds Won’t Legitimize Pot, But They’ll Still Tax The Hell Out Of It | HuffPo

Nearly half of U.S. states have legalized marijuana in some form, whether medical or recreational. But marijuana remains illegal under federal law, and as a result, the legitimate businesses selling the drug are subject to sky-high tax rates.

Dispensaries can’t deduct traditional business expenses like advertising costs, employee payroll, rent and health insurance from their combined federal and state taxes. That means dispensary owners around the U.S. often face effective tax rates of 50 to 60 percent — and in some states, those rates soar to 80 percent or higher …

In other words, the federal government rakes in tax revenue from pot shops while prohibiting them from accessing the same financial benefits afforded to non-cannabis businesses. …

Federal tax code 280E, an antiquated Internal Revenue Service rule enacted in the 1980s under President Ronald Reagan’s War on Drugs campaign, explicitly prohibits any deduction from any business that ‘consists of trafficking in controlled substances.’ Marijuana is currently listed alongside heroin and LSD as a Schedule I narcotic under the Controlled Substances Act. …

'All we want is to be treated like other businesses,' said Mike Elliott, executive director for the Medical Marijuana Industry Group which represents marijuana businesses in Colorado. 'The federal government doesn’t recognize our businesses as being legitimate, but they do demand our taxes. It’s really unfair treatment.' …

More than one dispensary owner, who requested anonymity when speaking about specific financial issues, told HuffPost that they estimated by the end of the year, they’ll be paying more than $1 million in sales tax to the federal government. And for some businesses, that tax is in cash.”

More than a dozen states are expected to legalize marijuana in the the coming years. One recent study has projected a $10 billion legal marijuana industry nationwide by 2018.”

The Feds Won’t Legitimize Pot, But They’ll Still Tax The Hell Out Of It | HuffPo

Everything you need to know about Colorado’s recreational marijuana law
Consumers
"People with a Colorado ID can buy up to an ounce of marijuana at a time. People with an out-of-state ID can buy up to a quarter ounce." 
BUT, “There’s nothing in the state’s rules for recreational marijuana stores that requires them to track customer purchases.”
Personal information
According to Amendment 64: “The department shall not require a consumer to provide a retail marijuana store with personal information other than government-issued identification to determine the consumer’s age, and a retail marijuana store shall not be required to acquire and record personal information about consumers other than information typically acquired in a financial transaction conducted at a retail liquor store.”
Consumption
Anywhere cigarette smoking is banned, so is pot. You cannot smoke it in stores, parks, ski slopes, or national parks; basically, anywhere in public. Taking marijuana out-of-state is still illegal, even if you’re traveling to another legal-marijuana state, and if you send it through USPS, you can face federal charges. You can however transport it in your car as long as you’re not smoking it.
The Feds
President Obama has stated that the feds won’t arrest individual users in Colorado and Washington. But, the DOJ has identified eight things it’s most concerned about, which include “preventing marijuana distribution to minors” and “preventing money from sales from going to criminal groups”.
Regulating stores
The state rulebook for stores is 136 pages long, and includes a $1.2 million seed-to-sale tracking system called MITS. 
"Every plant that a commercial grower sticks in dirt gets a radio-frequency tag that moves with the plant through its lifecycle. Once the marijuana is harvested, everything is weighed, then it’s weighed again after drying out and at other points during processing until it’s all packaged up to leave the grow. … At the shop, store owners are required to weigh their inventory every day. All of this data is entered into MITS."
However, “it’s up to the state’s pot auditors to actually scour the books and make sure it all matches up.”
Jobs
“The state Marijuana Enforcement Division is budgeted for 25 criminal investigators and six to eight compliance investigators. Considering that there will likely be hundreds of recreational marijuana stores, state officials say investigators will use the data in MITS as part of a risk-based enforcement approach, rather than making consistent, frequent checks at all stores, grows and infused-products businesses.”
Cost
An ounce can run anywhere from $150-$300, but don’t forget to add sales tax, special state sales and excise taxes, plus extra city sales and excise taxes which can add up to 29%.
State revenues
"The state’s nonpartisan voter guide — in estimating the revenues from marijuana tax measures — projected nearly $400 million a year in recreational marijuana sales. Considering that medical-marijuana stores, alone, did almost $330 million in sales in fiscal year 2013, that number might be low.”
Read on.

Everything you need to know about Colorado’s recreational marijuana law

Consumers

"People with a Colorado ID can buy up to an ounce of marijuana at a time. People with an out-of-state ID can buy up to a quarter ounce."

BUT, “There’s nothing in the state’s rules for recreational marijuana stores that requires them to track customer purchases.”

Personal information

According to Amendment 64: “The department shall not require a consumer to provide a retail marijuana store with personal information other than government-issued identification to determine the consumer’s age, and a retail marijuana store shall not be required to acquire and record personal information about consumers other than information typically acquired in a financial transaction conducted at a retail liquor store.”

Consumption

Anywhere cigarette smoking is banned, so is pot. You cannot smoke it in stores, parks, ski slopes, or national parks; basically, anywhere in public. Taking marijuana out-of-state is still illegal, even if you’re traveling to another legal-marijuana state, and if you send it through USPS, you can face federal charges. You can however transport it in your car as long as you’re not smoking it.

The Feds

President Obama has stated that the feds won’t arrest individual users in Colorado and Washington. But, the DOJ has identified eight things it’s most concerned about, which include “preventing marijuana distribution to minors” and “preventing money from sales from going to criminal groups”.

Regulating stores

The state rulebook for stores is 136 pages long, and includes a $1.2 million seed-to-sale tracking system called MITS. 

"Every plant that a commercial grower sticks in dirt gets a radio-frequency tag that moves with the plant through its lifecycle. Once the marijuana is harvested, everything is weighed, then it’s weighed again after drying out and at other points during processing until it’s all packaged up to leave the grow. … At the shop, store owners are required to weigh their inventory every day. All of this data is entered into MITS."

However, “it’s up to the state’s pot auditors to actually scour the books and make sure it all matches up.”

Jobs

The state Marijuana Enforcement Division is budgeted for 25 criminal investigators and six to eight compliance investigators. Considering that there will likely be hundreds of recreational marijuana stores, state officials say investigators will use the data in MITS as part of a risk-based enforcement approach, rather than making consistent, frequent checks at all stores, grows and infused-products businesses.”

Cost

An ounce can run anywhere from $150-$300, but don’t forget to add sales tax, special state sales and excise taxes, plus extra city sales and excise taxes which can add up to 29%.

State revenues

"The state’s nonpartisan voter guide — in estimating the revenues from marijuana tax measures — projected nearly $400 million a year in recreational marijuana sales. Considering that medical-marijuana stores, alone, did almost $330 million in sales in fiscal year 2013, that number might be low.”

Read on.

©2011 Kateoplis