black holes and gray matter. in one thousand tangos.

             
"I’m 87 years old…I only eat so I can smoke and stay alive.. The only fear I have is how long consciousness is gonna hang on after my body goes. I just hope there’s nothing. Like there was before I was born. I’m not really into religion, they’re all macrocosms of the ego. When man began to think he was a separate person with a separate soul, it created a violent situation.
The void, the concept of nothingness, is terrifying to most people on the planet. And I get anxiety attacks myself. I know the fear of that void. You have to learn to die before you die. You give up, surrender to the void, to nothingness.
Anybody else you’ve interviewed bring these things up? Hang on, I gotta take this call….. Hey, brother. That’s great, man. Yeah, I’m being interviewed… We’re talking about nothing. I’ve got him well-steeped in nothing right now. He’s stopped asking questions.”
- Harry Dean Stanton

"I’m 87 years old…I only eat so I can smoke and stay alive.. The only fear I have is how long consciousness is gonna hang on after my body goes. I just hope there’s nothing. Like there was before I was born. I’m not really into religion, they’re all macrocosms of the ego. When man began to think he was a separate person with a separate soul, it created a violent situation.

The void, the concept of nothingness, is terrifying to most people on the planet. And I get anxiety attacks myself. I know the fear of that void. You have to learn to die before you die. You give up, surrender to the void, to nothingness.

Anybody else you’ve interviewed bring these things up? Hang on, I gotta take this call….. Hey, brother. That’s great, man. Yeah, I’m being interviewed… We’re talking about nothing. I’ve got him well-steeped in nothing right now. He’s stopped asking questions.”

- Harry Dean Stanton

(via bbook)

“Jim Jarmusch is old school. He writes all his scripts out by hand and then dictates them to a typist. Ideas are jotted down in small, color-coordinated notebooks and, despite the presence of an iPad and iPhone in his life, he doesn’t have email. ‘I don’t have enough time as it is to read a book or make music, or see my friends… no, I do not have email.’ …
Jarmusch could be called vampiric, too, and not just for his predominantly black wardrobe and movie-villain-like nimbus of silver hair, which he has styled and cut himself since he was a boy. At 61, he still has an unquenched cultural thirst: old school but with a tremendous jones for new (or new-to-him) projects. …
More than three decades into filmmaking, Mr. Jarmusch remains the rare indie director who achieved critical success (and four prizes at Cannes) and enough prestige to cast bankable movie stars like Cate Blanchett and Johnny Depp, and yet never made a move toward Hollywood, never even leapt at directing a commercial. Instead he has maintained, in movies and music, his own wry, rad vision. …
Coming projects include a quasi-documentary about the Stooges (“a little poetic essay,” Mr. Jarmusch said); an opera about Nikola Tesla, in collaboration with his friend the composer Phil Kline and the international director Robert Wilson; and another feature, about a bus driver and poet in Paterson, N.J., that Mr. Jarmusch wrote in the years he waited for “Only Lovers” to come together.
'I take on a lot more now,' he said, partly out of age, experience and desire, and partly out of professional gumption. …
[A]s an aficionado of decay, he has, of course, imagined his own demise.
The Zoroastrians, an ancient Iranian religious group, ‘get eaten by vultures,’ he said. ‘They put their dead bodies on a mountaintop, and they get eaten. I would love that.’”
This Time, Jim Jarmusch is Kissing Vampires 

Jim Jarmusch is old school. He writes all his scripts out by hand and then dictates them to a typist. Ideas are jotted down in small, color-coordinated notebooks and, despite the presence of an iPad and iPhone in his life, he doesn’t have email. ‘I don’t have enough time as it is to read a book or make music, or see my friends… no, I do not have email.’ …

Jarmusch could be called vampiric, too, and not just for his predominantly black wardrobe and movie-villain-like nimbus of silver hair, which he has styled and cut himself since he was a boy. At 61, he still has an unquenched cultural thirst: old school but with a tremendous jones for new (or new-to-him) projects. …

More than three decades into filmmaking, Mr. Jarmusch remains the rare indie director who achieved critical success (and four prizes at Cannes) and enough prestige to cast bankable movie stars like Cate Blanchett and Johnny Depp, and yet never made a move toward Hollywood, never even leapt at directing a commercial. Instead he has maintained, in movies and music, his own wry, rad vision. …

Coming projects include a quasi-documentary about the Stooges (“a little poetic essay,” Mr. Jarmusch said); an opera about Nikola Tesla, in collaboration with his friend the composer Phil Kline and the international director Robert Wilson; and another feature, about a bus driver and poet in Paterson, N.J., that Mr. Jarmusch wrote in the years he waited for “Only Lovers” to come together.

'I take on a lot more now,' he said, partly out of age, experience and desire, and partly out of professional gumption. …

[A]s an aficionado of decay, he has, of course, imagined his own demise.

The Zoroastrians, an ancient Iranian religious group, ‘get eaten by vultures,’ he said. ‘They put their dead bodies on a mountaintop, and they get eaten. I would love that.’”

This Time, Jim Jarmusch is Kissing Vampires 

“Yesterday when a friend was all, “Oh my God, have you seen the Kanye video?” I was like, no, I don’t care about the Kanye video and I feel as if it is one of the few signal achievements in my career, if we want to call it that, that I have somehow gotten myself into a position where I don’t need to have an opinion about the Kanye video, and, more importantly, no one really needs to have an opinion about the Kanye video, the fact that you are going to watch something that is widely acknowledged to be terrible—the fact that you are going to watch something and hope while you watch that it is exactly as terrible as widely acknowledged—so that you can be a part of the “conversation,” which is just an empty and ridiculous exchange of self-important jack-offs trying to speak as loudly as possible so that they can drown out the inner voice that tells them just how shockingly bereft of value their own lives are as they careen towards oblivion, is a remarkable indictment of the vacuous, hollow pit we confuse with culture these days. You don’t have to watch ANYTHING, and the less you say about something the smarter you are. Good Lord, people, listen to yourselves, if you can even stand it, it’s horrifying. (I had switched to the second person plural at this point because my friend, having heard so many variations of this monologue already, had long since wandered off.) Anyway, that was before I saw this Bob Dylan video, which is really something. And I say this as someone who doesn’t go in for the concept of “interactive” at all. It’s pretty neat!”
©2011 Kateoplis