black holes and gray matter. in one thousand tangos.

             

Cell phones generate electromagnetic fields (EMF), and emit electromagnetic radiation (EMR). They share this feature with all modern electronics that run on alternating current (AC) power (from the power grid and the outlets in your walls) or that utilize wireless communication. Different devices radiate different levels of EMF, with different characteristics. …

The many potential negative health effects from EMF exposure (including many cancers and Alzheimer’s disease) can take decades to develop. So we won’t know the results of this experiment for many years—possibly decades. But by then, it may be too late for billions of people. …the entire power grid is an EMF-generation network that reaches almost every individual in America and 75% of the global population. Today, early in the 21st century, we find ourselves fully immersed in a soup of electromagnetic radiation on a nearly continuous basis. …

While cancer is one of the primary classes of negative health effects studied by researchers, EMF exposure has been shown to increase risk for many other types of negative health outcomes. In fact, levels of EMF thousands of times lower than current safety standards have been shown to significantly increase risk for neurodegenerative diseases (such as Alzheimer’s and Lou Gehrig’s disease) and male infertility associated with damaged sperm cells. In one study, those who lived within 50 meters of a high voltage power line were significantly more likely to develop Alzheimer’s disease when compared to those living 600 meters or more away. The increased risk was 24% after one year, 50% after 5 years, and 100% after 10 years. Other research demonstrates that using a cell phone between two and four hours a day leads to 40% lower sperm counts than found in men who do not use cell phones, and the surviving sperm cells demonstrate lower levels of motility and viability.

EMF exposure (as with many environmental pollutants) not only affects people, but all of nature. In fact, negative effects have been demonstrated across a wide variety of plant and animal life. EMF, even at very low levels, can interrupt the ability of birds and bees to navigate. Numerous studies link this effect with the phenomena of avian tower fatalities (in which birds die from collisions with power line and communications towers). These same navigational effects have been linked to colony collapse disorder (CCD), which is devastating the global population of honey bees (in one study, placement of a single active cell phone in front of a hive led to the rapid and complete demise of the entire colony). And a mystery illness affecting trees around Europe has been linked to WiFi radiation in the environment. …

[M]odern technology (the source of the humanmade electromagnetic fields discussed here) has fueled a remarkable degree of innovation, productivity, and improvement in the quality of life. If tomorrow the power grid went down, all cell phone networks would cease operation, millions of computers around the world wouldn’t turn on, and the night would be illuminated only by candlelight and the moon—we’d have a lot less EMF exposure, but at the cost of the complete collapse of modern society.

EMF isn’t just a by-product of modern society. EMF, and our ability to harness it for technological purposes, is the cornerstone of modern society. Sanitation, food production and storage, health care—these are just some of the essential social systems that rely on power and wireless communication. We have evolved a society that is fundamentally reliant upon a set of technologies that generate forms and levels of electromagnetic radiation not seen on this planet prior to the 19th century.

As a result of the central role these devices play in modern life, individuals are understandably predisposed to resist information that may challenge the safety of activities that result in EMF exposures. People simply cannot bear the thought of restricting their time with— much less giving up—these beloved gadgets. This gives industry a huge advantage because there is a large segment of the public that would rather not know.

"[A]ccording to NASA, a highly unusual ‘Tetrad’ – four successive total ‘blood-red’ lunar eclipses each followed by six full moons – will, indeed, start next Tuesday and finish on September 28 2015. The incredible alignment has only happened a handful of times in the last two thousand years but, remarkably, on each of the last three occasions it has coincided with a globally significant religious event.”
NASA: “This is the first of four consecutive total lunar eclipses in 2014 and 2015 - a series known as a Tetrad. …The 565-year period of the Tetrad ‘seasons’ is tied to the slowly decreasing eccentricity of Earth’s orbit. Consequently, the Tetrad period is gradually decreasing. In the distant future Tetrads will no longer be possible.”
Pastor and author John Hagee: “According to the Biblical prophecy, world history is about to change dramatically.
Every time this has happened in the last 500 years, it has coincided with tragedy for the Jewish people followed by triumph. And once again, for Israel, the timing of this Tetrad is remarkable. The first of the four blood moons will come on April 15 this year, during Passover. The second will be on October 8, at the time of the Feast of the Tabernacles. On April 4 2015, during Passover, we will have another blood moon. Then finally, on September 28, during next year’s Feast of the Tabernacles, the fourth blood and final moon will dawn.” 
Apocalypse Now

"[A]ccording to NASA, a highly unusual ‘Tetrad’ – four successive total ‘blood-red’ lunar eclipses each followed by six full moons – will, indeed, start next Tuesday and finish on September 28 2015. The incredible alignment has only happened a handful of times in the last two thousand years but, remarkably, on each of the last three occasions it has coincided with a globally significant religious event.”

NASA: “This is the first of four consecutive total lunar eclipses in 2014 and 2015 - a series known as a Tetrad. …The 565-year period of the Tetrad ‘seasons’ is tied to the slowly decreasing eccentricity of Earth’s orbit. Consequently, the Tetrad period is gradually decreasing. In the distant future Tetrads will no longer be possible.”

Pastor and author John Hagee: “According to the Biblical prophecy, world history is about to change dramatically.

Every time this has happened in the last 500 years, it has coincided with tragedy for the Jewish people followed by triumph. And once again, for Israel, the timing of this Tetrad is remarkable. The first of the four blood moons will come on April 15 this year, during Passover. The second will be on October 8, at the time of the Feast of the Tabernacles. On April 4 2015, during Passover, we will have another blood moon. Then finally, on September 28, during next year’s Feast of the Tabernacles, the fourth blood and final moon will dawn.” 

Apocalypse Now

"NASA has run a technology transfer program for over 50 years. It has given us everything from the Dustbuster to Giro bicycle helmets to “space rose,” a unique perfume scent forged in zero-Gs. But it’s high time the agency actively pushed out its software code as well…
Already, NASA software has been used to do some pretty amazing stuff outside the agency. In 2005, marine biologists adapted the Hubble Space Telescope’s star-mapping algorithm to track and identify endangered whale sharks. That software has now been adapted to track polar bears in the arctic and sunfish in the Galapagos Islands.
'Our design software has been used to make everything from guitars to roller coasters to Cadillacs.'”
NASA is releasing more than 1,000 of its codes to the public today

"NASA has run a technology transfer program for over 50 years. It has given us everything from the Dustbuster to Giro bicycle helmets to “space rose,” a unique perfume scent forged in zero-Gs. But it’s high time the agency actively pushed out its software code as well…

Already, NASA software has been used to do some pretty amazing stuff outside the agency. In 2005, marine biologists adapted the Hubble Space Telescope’s star-mapping algorithm to track and identify endangered whale sharks. That software has now been adapted to track polar bears in the arctic and sunfish in the Galapagos Islands.

'Our design software has been used to make everything from guitars to roller coasters to Cadillacs.'”

NASA is releasing more than 1,000 of its codes to the public today

A Ghost Heart, ready to be injected with a transplant recipient’s stem cells so a new heart — one that won’t be rejected — can be grown.
"Take a pig heart, soak it in an ingredient commonly found in shampoo and wash away the cells until you’re left with a protein scaffold that is to a heart what two-by-four framing is to a house.
Then inject that ghost heart, as it’s called, with hundreds of millions of blood or bone-marrow stem cells from a person who needs a heart transplant, place it in a bioreactor - a box with artificial lungs and tubes that pump oxygen and blood into it - and wait as the ghost heart begins to mature into a new, beating human heart.
Doris Taylor, director of regenerative medicine research at the Texas Heart Institute at St. Luke’s Episcopal Hospital in Houston, has been working on this — first using rat hearts, then pig hearts and human hearts — for years. …
'The nice thing about this technology,' Taylor says, 'is that it will work with any organ or tissue. So it's not just about hearts.'”
Ghost heart [spectacularuniverse]

A Ghost Heart, ready to be injected with a transplant recipient’s stem cells so a new heart — one that won’t be rejected — can be grown.

"Take a pig heart, soak it in an ingredient commonly found in shampoo and wash away the cells until you’re left with a protein scaffold that is to a heart what two-by-four framing is to a house.

Then inject that ghost heart, as it’s called, with hundreds of millions of blood or bone-marrow stem cells from a person who needs a heart transplant, place it in a bioreactor - a box with artificial lungs and tubes that pump oxygen and blood into it - and wait as the ghost heart begins to mature into a new, beating human heart.

Doris Taylor, director of regenerative medicine research at the Texas Heart Institute at St. Luke’s Episcopal Hospital in Houston, has been working on this — first using rat hearts, then pig hearts and human hearts — for years. …

'The nice thing about this technology,' Taylor says, 'is that it will work with any organ or tissue. So it's not just about hearts.'”

Ghost heart [spectacularuniverse]

(via elvira)

"This is what almost four billion years of human evolution looks like when it’s condensed down to ten seconds, thanks to the fine folks behind the original Cosmos.
From self-replicating bags of chemistry to billions of bacteria to crude multicellular blobs to tiny swimming monsters to clumsily creeping fish to fuzzy proto-mammals to weird, naked, two-legged apes … every cosmic blink holds a beautiful story.
If you’d like to retrace your steps along the path of time that ends with you, I recommend this awesome Wikipedia page.” jtotheizzoe

"This is what almost four billion years of human evolution looks like when it’s condensed down to ten seconds, thanks to the fine folks behind the original Cosmos.

From self-replicating bags of chemistry to billions of bacteria to crude multicellular blobs to tiny swimming monsters to clumsily creeping fish to fuzzy proto-mammals to weird, naked, two-legged apes … every cosmic blink holds a beautiful story.

If you’d like to retrace your steps along the path of time that ends with you, I recommend this awesome Wikipedia page.” jtotheizzoe

"Forty-one million IQ points. That’s what Dr. David Bellinger determined Americans have collectively forfeited as a result of exposure to lead, mercury, and organophosphate pesticides. In a 2012 paper published by the National Institutes of Health, Bellinger, a professor of neurology at Harvard Medical School, compared intelligence quotients among children whose mothers had been exposed to these neurotoxins while pregnant to those who had not. Bellinger calculates a total loss of 16.9 million IQ points due to exposure to organophosphates, the most common pesticides used in agriculture.”

This “silent pandemic” of toxins is believed to be “causing not just lower IQs, but ADHD and autism spectrum disorder.”

The Toxins That Threaten Our Brains | The Atlantic

"We’ve discovered a thousand planets orbiting other stars. We’ve discovered a new branch of the tree of life called, collectively, "extremophiles," that thrive in conditions that can kill other animal and humans — conditions of high pressure, high radiation, high density — or low density, low pressure; anything that we would think of as extreme is just natural for this branch of life. …
The whole field of astrobiology has come of age; we’re searching for the signatures of life in the atmospheres of the exoplanets, for example. We’ve confirmed that the dinosaurs died by asteroid, and that asteroid crater is in the Yucatan Peninsula in what is now Mexico. So the idea that such an event could render 70%of the world’s species extinct is itself an extraordinary result. 
What else has deepened? We know the age of the universe with more precision than ever before; we know a little bit more about the behavior of subatomic particles with the discovery of the Higgs Boson, a field made by a particle that gives mass to other particles; there’s discussion of the multiverse, where we are just one bubble out of an uncountable number of other bubbles of universes coming in and out of existence. So there’s a lot more science, but Cosmos is not about bringing the latest science to the public. There are documentaries that do that, and very good documentaries at that. …
What distinguishes us is the context in which this information is presented, and the context for Cosmos is how and why any of this science matters; what effect does it have on your outlook, your cosmic perspective; and in that way Cosmos can be taken to heart; Cosmos can influence you not only intellectually but emotionally. And with its good doses of awe and wonder, it can even affect you spiritually.”
Read on: Rolling Stone

"We’ve discovered a thousand planets orbiting other stars. We’ve discovered a new branch of the tree of life called, collectively, "extremophiles," that thrive in conditions that can kill other animal and humans — conditions of high pressure, high radiation, high density — or low density, low pressure; anything that we would think of as extreme is just natural for this branch of life. …

The whole field of astrobiology has come of age; we’re searching for the signatures of life in the atmospheres of the exoplanets, for example. We’ve confirmed that the dinosaurs died by asteroid, and that asteroid crater is in the Yucatan Peninsula in what is now Mexico. So the idea that such an event could render 70%of the world’s species extinct is itself an extraordinary result. 

What else has deepened? We know the age of the universe with more precision than ever before; we know a little bit more about the behavior of subatomic particles with the discovery of the Higgs Boson, a field made by a particle that gives mass to other particles; there’s discussion of the multiverse, where we are just one bubble out of an uncountable number of other bubbles of universes coming in and out of existence. So there’s a lot more science, but Cosmos is not about bringing the latest science to the public. There are documentaries that do that, and very good documentaries at that. …

What distinguishes us is the context in which this information is presented, and the context for Cosmos is how and why any of this science matters; what effect does it have on your outlook, your cosmic perspective; and in that way Cosmos can be taken to heart; Cosmos can influence you not only intellectually but emotionally. And with its good doses of awe and wonder, it can even affect you spiritually.”

Read on: Rolling Stone

"A poignant moment occurs near the end of the first episode of “Cosmos: A Spacetime Odyssey,” a rollicking 13-part tour of the universe to be broadcast on Fox starting on Sunday.
Sitting on a rock by the Pacific, Neil deGrasse Tyson, host of the show and director of the Hayden Planetarium in New York City, pulls out an old desk calendar that had belonged to Carl Sagan, the Cornell astronomer and author. On a date in 1975 he finds his own name. The most famous astronomer in the land had invited young Neil, then a high school student in the Bronx with a passion for astronomy, to spend a day in Ithaca.
Dr. Sagan kindly offered to put him up for the night if his bus didn’t come. As Dr. Tyson told the story, he already knew he wanted to be an astronomer, but that day, he said, “I learned from Carl the kind of person I wanted to be.” …
After a series of special showings this week, including one at the White House, it will be shown in 170 countries and 45 languages, on Fox and on the National Geographic Channel — the largest global opening ever for a television series, according to Ann Druyan, Dr. Sagan’s widow and his collaborator on the original “Cosmos,” who is an executive producer and a writer and director of the new series.
I’m not going to pretend to be neutral here. I hope it succeeds and that everyone watches it, not just because I have known Ms. Druyan and admired Dr. Tyson for years, but because we all need a unifying dose of curiosity and wonder. …
We could use a national conversation that is not about scandal or sports.”
"Much of the first episode consists of a tour of the solar system and then outward as Dr. Tyson fills out what he calls our long address:
Earth.
Solar system.
Milky Way galaxy.
Local Group.
Virgo supercluster.
Observable universe.
And we get to hop along a cosmic calendar in which the 13.8-billion-year history of the universe has been compressed to 365 days and it’s now midnight on New Year’s Eve.
On this scale, Dr. Tyson reports, the sun was born on Aug. 31, and the dinosaurs died yesterday morning in that asteroid blast. Everybody you ever heard of, all the kings and queens and prophets, lived in the last 14 seconds of this cosmic year. ‘Jesus was born five seconds ago,’ he goes on.
'In the last second we began to do science,' he concludes. 'It allowed us to discover where and when we are in the cosmos.'
This is going to be fun.”
A Successor to Sagan Reboots Cosmos

"A poignant moment occurs near the end of the first episode of “Cosmos: A Spacetime Odyssey,” a rollicking 13-part tour of the universe to be broadcast on Fox starting on Sunday.

Sitting on a rock by the Pacific, Neil deGrasse Tyson, host of the show and director of the Hayden Planetarium in New York City, pulls out an old desk calendar that had belonged to Carl Sagan, the Cornell astronomer and author. On a date in 1975 he finds his own name. The most famous astronomer in the land had invited young Neil, then a high school student in the Bronx with a passion for astronomy, to spend a day in Ithaca.

Dr. Sagan kindly offered to put him up for the night if his bus didn’t come. As Dr. Tyson told the story, he already knew he wanted to be an astronomer, but that day, he said, “I learned from Carl the kind of person I wanted to be.” …

After a series of special showings this week, including one at the White House, it will be shown in 170 countries and 45 languages, on Fox and on the National Geographic Channel — the largest global opening ever for a television series, according to Ann Druyan, Dr. Sagan’s widow and his collaborator on the original “Cosmos,” who is an executive producer and a writer and director of the new series.

I’m not going to pretend to be neutral here. I hope it succeeds and that everyone watches it, not just because I have known Ms. Druyan and admired Dr. Tyson for years, but because we all need a unifying dose of curiosity and wonder. …

We could use a national conversation that is not about scandal or sports.”

"Much of the first episode consists of a tour of the solar system and then outward as Dr. Tyson fills out what he calls our long address:

Earth.

Solar system.

Milky Way galaxy.

Local Group.

Virgo supercluster.

Observable universe.

And we get to hop along a cosmic calendar in which the 13.8-billion-year history of the universe has been compressed to 365 days and it’s now midnight on New Year’s Eve.

On this scale, Dr. Tyson reports, the sun was born on Aug. 31, and the dinosaurs died yesterday morning in that asteroid blast. Everybody you ever heard of, all the kings and queens and prophets, lived in the last 14 seconds of this cosmic year. ‘Jesus was born five seconds ago,’ he goes on.

'In the last second we began to do science,' he concludes. 'It allowed us to discover where and when we are in the cosmos.'

This is going to be fun.

A Successor to Sagan Reboots Cosmos

©2011 Kateoplis