black holes and gray matter. in one thousand tangos.

             
nickturse:

Army Pfc. Bradley Manning (L) leaves the courthouse after his motion hearing at Fort Meade, Maryland March 15, 2012. Manning, a U.S. Army intelligence analyst accused of the largest leak of classified documents in U.S. history, deferred pleading guilty or not guilty in a military court arraignment on Thursday, marking the first step in a court martial that could land him imprisonment for life. Reuters

“The United Nations official investigating the American military’s treatment of Bradley Manning has ruled that the US government imposed cruel, inhuman, degrading and borderline torturous treatment on the alleged WikiLeaks contributor…  In a just-published addendum on international torture issues submitted to the UN’s Human Rights Council, Mendez writes that his investigation into America’s detainment of Manning leads him to believe that the US is at fault for imposing cruel and inhumane treatment on the soldier. The rapporteur explicitly calls out the United States for holding Manning in solitary confinement for 23-hours a day for a period of nearly a year, all the while neglecting to formally file charges against the soldier.” (via)

nickturse:

Army Pfc. Bradley Manning (L) leaves the courthouse after his motion hearing at Fort Meade, Maryland March 15, 2012. Manning, a U.S. Army intelligence analyst accused of the largest leak of classified documents in U.S. history, deferred pleading guilty or not guilty in a military court arraignment on Thursday, marking the first step in a court martial that could land him imprisonment for life. Reuters

The United Nations official investigating the American military’s treatment of Bradley Manning has ruled that the US government imposed cruel, inhuman, degrading and borderline torturous treatment on the alleged WikiLeaks contributor…  In a just-published addendum on international torture issues submitted to the UN’s Human Rights Council, Mendez writes that his investigation into America’s detainment of Manning leads him to believe that the US is at fault for imposing cruel and inhumane treatment on the soldier. The rapporteur explicitly calls out the United States for holding Manning in solitary confinement for 23-hours a day for a period of nearly a year, all the while neglecting to formally file charges against the soldier.” (via)

KROFT: But you were screwing with the forces of nature. You have made some of the most powerful people in the world your enemies. You had to expect that they might retaliate. ASSANGE: Oh, no. I fully expected they’ll retaliate. Well, they see it as highly embarrassing. I think what it’s really about is keeping the illusion of control. I’m not surprised about that. I am surprised at this sort of flagrant disregard for U.S. traditions. That is what I’m surprised about. 
Assange, tonight on 60 Minutes

KROFT: But you were screwing with the forces of nature. You have made some of the most powerful people in the world your enemies. You had to expect that they might retaliate. 

ASSANGE: Oh, no. I fully expected they’ll retaliate. Well, they see it as highly embarrassing. I think what it’s really about is keeping the illusion of control. I’m not surprised about that. I am surprised at this sort of flagrant disregard for U.S. traditions. That is what I’m surprised about. 

Assange, tonight on 60 Minutes

Glenn Greenwald: How Propaganda Poisons the Mind - and Our Discourse

Last week, on January 3, The Guardian published a scathing Op-Ed by James Richardson blaming WikiLeaks for endangering the life of Morgan Tsvangirai, the leader of the democratic opposition in Zimbabwe. Richardson — a GOP operative, contributor to RedState.com, and a for-hire corporate spokesman — pointed to a cable published by WikiLeaks in which American diplomats revealed that Tsvangirai, while publicly opposing American sanctions on his country, had privately urged their continuation as a means of weakening the Mugabe regime: an act likely to be deemed to be treasonous in that country, for obvious reasons. By publishing this cable, “WikiLeaks may have committed its own collateral murder,” Richardson wrote.  He added: “WikiLeaks ought to leave international relations to those who understand it – at least to those who understand the value of a life.”

This accusation against WikiLeaks was repeated far and wide. See The Wall Street Journal […] and The Atlantic's "How WikiLeaks Just Set Back Democracy in Zimbabwe," echoing the same accusation, claiming “WikiLeaks released [this cable] to the world” and that Assange has thus “provided a tyrant with the ammunition to wound, and perhaps kill, any chance for multiparty democracy.”  Numerous other outlets predictably mimicked these claims.

There was just one small problem with all of this: it was totally false. It wasn’t WikiLeaks which chose that cable to be placed into the public domain, nor was it WikiLeaks which first published it. It was The Guardian that did that. In early December, that newspaper — not WikiLeaks — selected and then published the cable in question. This fact led The Guardian — more than a full week after they published Richardson’s accusatory column — to sheepishly add this obscured though extremely embarrassing “clarification” at the end of his column: 

• This article was amended on 11 January 2011 to clarify the fact that the 2009 cable referred to in this article was placed in the public domain by the Guardian, and not as originally implied by WikiLeaks. The photo caption was also amended to reflect this fact.

The way this “clarification” was done was bizarre. […] If a newspaper publishes an accusation this serious and gets it this wrong, isn’t more required than the quiet addition of two short sentences at the end of the column, eight days later without any announcement? […]

But at least The Guardian — for which I have high journalistic regard — published some sort of correction, woefully inadequate though it may be. Why hasn’t The Wall Street Journal, or The Atlantic, or Politico [Politico just made a correction]? While The Guardian appended this correction yesterday, WikiLeaks on Twitter — a full week ago — made clear the falsehood driving all these stories: “It is not acceptable [for] the Guardian to blame us for a cable the Guardian selected and published on Dec 8.” WikiLeaks then immediately pointed to this post thoroughly documenting that it was The Guardian that first published this cable as part of a December 8 news article it published regarding revelations about Zimbabwe. So this glaring, serious error has been publicly known and amplified for a full week (through WikiLeaks’ Twitter account, followed by 650,000 people, which presumably is followed by anyone writing about WikiLeaks, at least I’d hope so).

Yet these Beacons of Journalistic Responsibility have still failed to acknowledge that the very serious accusation they published about WikiLeaks was based in a wholesale fabrication.

Read this

“I endorse, sympathize with, and empathize with, the rape consciousness goals of #mooreandme, and have already apologized accordingly. But I cannot defend and will not accept their tactics which mirror so many of the attitudes and threats they fight. I do not know of what Julian Assange is guilty, if anything, and neither does anybody else. But given the extraordinary efforts by Sweden to extradite him, to say he is benefiting from some form of rape apologism is not fact-based. It is also unfair to condemn as anti-feminist those who merely address the juxtaposition of this prosecution to the fact that Assange threatens the secret and nefarious activities of dozens of governments. And I will not engage those who suggest that those who do not prioritize one issue to the exclusion of all others should succumb to forced financial contributions, or should ‘kill themselves’ (examples of each will be retweeted shortly, along with my previous apology). The #mooreandme attacks do not help those who fight against rape, they hurt them. And indeed they feature something larger than anti-feminist. This is, to use a clunky phrase, anti-personism.”
©2011 Kateoplis